I’m going to get this out now Need For Speed Heat is the ugly version of Forza Horizon 4 with added police chasing and since games such as Horizon 4 exist I don’t see why anyone would waste there time on this game. I know this is a more arcade-style game, but it honestly feels like it was thrown together.

Car Selection

The car roster is varied and the means of customization are deep, and none of it is exposed to microtransactions. It all sounds good on paper, but it only looks good, sounds good, and that’s where it all ends. Upgrades are straight forward you have to be leveled up to the required level and have enough cash to purchase the parts. You can tune any car to be tailored to race, drift, and on-road/off-road use.

Vehicle Upgrades

The vehicle upgrades are split into four different groups: Engine, Chassis, Drivetrain, and Auxiliary. Personally, I think EA did well when it comes to customization. It even lets you swap your motor and choose what type of forced induction you want. At the beginning purchasing nitrous doesn’t even feel like it’s giving you a boost. There are many times where I use nitrous and I wouldn’t even gain on my opponents and would have my asking why even have this installed if it was only going to give me an effect, but not get me anywhere closer to my opponent.

Career Mode

With this year’s installment, You assume the role of a rookie street racer looking to make his name on the roads of Palm City. Selecting your character from around a dozen pre-set avatars. Every one of them made me depressed due to EA thinking these remotely even look like street racers. They look more like confused kids that have never turned a wrench in there life. In the early goings of Need for Speed Heat, you’re grinding it out with the up-from-nothing street racer fantasy, and driving a POS  that has you needing to earn the respect, make some money and upgrade your car while dodging the cops routine.

It’s the typical NFS story. Palm City is home to the SpeedBreakers Festival and is Need for Speed Heat’s new playground. It’s a Miami-inspired map and it looks like a great fit for the classic Need for Speed look. The city itself is the big highlight here and the surrounding countryside is pretty boring, but there are a few other cool spots, including a mini Cape Canaveral-style space center, a fun abandoned racing oval, and a big container yard begging for a shred session. Daytime Palm City is defined by regular, sanctioned street racing on marked courses for cash payouts, while night racing is all about illegal, underground racing and running from the popo to build up rep points. Both are needed to progress through Heat’s story, the night-races are the same as the daytime ones. But there is one big difference, the police. At night, the streets are patrolled by the fastest police cruisers in the world or what seems like it when you’re starting out, and they’ll start chasing you regardless of whether you’re in a race or just traveling through the world, attempting to bring your car to a halt either by boxing you in or simply wrecking it. If you’re in a race and cross the finish line with the police tailing you, the pursuit will continue until you can shake them off.

Police Chases

EA should have thought out the police chases because it seems like they put no effort into coding the A.I. instead of having them chase you anytime you run into the police. I enjoy the older EA games that the cops only chassed you when you were speeding or ran a red light. It made it seem like those other games had more thought put into them as suppose to every time the A.I. encountered you they just chassed you. Like can a brotha relax and go for a peaceful night drive without getting profiled because I’m driving a sex-machine. The rep you earn each night is only added to your total when you turn it in at a garage. If the police bust you before you can get to safety, then it all goes straight out your exhaust pipe. This results in some wonderful cat and mouse chases as you try to sneak through the commercial centre of Palm City, slipping through alleyways and backyards as you try to avoid those deadly red triangles hunting for you on the minimap. The car has a damage meter so that if the cops damage your car enough you will be arrested. EA also has a chase timer that I personally think isn’t needed because the damage system is enough and if the police haven’t caught you then why should a time limit be in the game.

Conclusion
If you want to just add another racer to your collection I understand as this is just an ok game to me, but there are definitely better racing titles that give you a better experience minus to police chase.